?

Log in

No account? Create an account
 
 
22 January 2012 @ 12:36 am
talking Black March (not the book)  
So, SOPA/PIPA are off the table. For now at least. (Some info here and here.) It's a relief, but I can't help thinking it'll have a rethink and come back later.

What's going around now is Black March, which is essentially a proposed boycott of the media industry this March. In principal it seems like a good idea: showing the big corporations that without their customers they have nothing. But I just don't think it'll have much impact overall.

A boycott is essentially doing nothing and that's hard to measure. How will the industry know who is boycotting and who just can't afford anything in March, or who just didn't want to buy anything in March? And sure, they'll be a cut in profits, but it won't be the decision-makers at the top of the pile that will feel the impact of that, it'll be the everyday people in the customer facing roles, stacking shelves and suffering through the recession already.

People standing up and saying something, signing petitions and making noise, cluttering up the inboxes of officials, mithering, making a splash in the news - that I believe would make more of an impact in this case (and I like to think it's contributed to the tabling of SOPA/PIPA).

I've been chatting with people lately about what constitutes protesting and what's an effective form of protest. Any thoughts, in relation to Black March or otherwise?
 
 
feeling: relaxedrelaxed
 
 
 
rthstewartrthstewart on January 22nd, 2012 02:13 am (UTC)
Someone at the Cato Institute did an analysis of just how bogus the numbers are in support of SOPA/PIPA in terms of how little the entertainment contributes the economy and jobs. http://www.cato-at-liberty.org/how-copyright-industries-con-congress/

The MPAA and friends keep citing this so called data and it's BAD. Really, rally bad. In this time of focus upon income and job creation, pointing out, repeatedly and vocally that the laws will NOT do what their proponents say they will do in terms of contribution to the economy is really important. I heard Harry Reid repeating the same numbers and it's just bad data. That's where I see effective protest -- informing the Congress clearly and precisely that the numbers used to support the legislation are bogus. Every time you see an article repeating them, write. Because this is the other half of the equation -- amorphous internet freedom against what is perceived to be huge piracy damage to the economy. Take away the economy argument and supporters are going to be looking at it saying that this not worth the effort.
inkvoices: dr who:the impossible amy pondinkvoices on January 22nd, 2012 01:10 pm (UTC)
Yes. Not only speaking out, but speaking out with sense that kills the arguement.

Although the fact that supposedly intelligent people who are making the decisions are using bad information and data on which to build their arguments is just damn scary in the first place :S
rthstewartrthstewart on January 22nd, 2012 01:35 pm (UTC)
Although the fact that supposedly intelligent people who are making the decisions are using bad information and data on which to build their arguments is just damn scary in the first place :S
That's assuming a lot of Congressmen and women when the entertainment lobbyists have access to get their points made and $$$ for fundraising. There was also an unholy alliance at work here that was going to cut across party lines -- everyone is against piracy, right? (especially those on the right) and the entertainment industry itself is overwhelmingly supportive of Obama. MPAA hired Chris Dodd, the ultimate insider. The lobbyists write the legislation and present it along with a nice fundraiser and big check to the PAC and it's assuming a lot to think that any of these people understand it.